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    How to Handle the Death of an Employee in Your Small Business

    posted by Rachel Blakely-Gray
    Newest Article
  • How to Handle the Death of an Employee in Your Small Business

    An employee’s death can be sudden and unexpected. But, you can’t be caught unaware by your employer responsibilities for handling the death of an employee.

    Although a difficult topic, you need to know what to do when an employee dies. From notifying your staff to paying out deceased employee wages, you can’t neglect your duties. Not to mention, how you handle an employee’s death speaks volumes about you and your business.

    The Pros and Cons of Hiring Seasonal Employees for Your Small Business

    Some small businesses only operate during parts of the year, such as snow plow and lawn care services. These types of businesses are usually considered seasonal employers. The idea of hiring seasonal employees may sound appealing. But, you should weigh your pros and cons before you decide to become a seasonal employer.

    What to Know About Form 941 Reconciliation

    As a small business owner, you have likely heard of IRS Form 941. If you file IRS Form 941, do you know the steps you must follow for Form 941 reconciliation? Find out how to reconcile Form 941 and why reconciliation is important for your small business.

    Creating an Unlimited PTO Policy

    Offering paid time off (PTO) is a benefit many small business owners extend to employees. Although the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not typically require PTO, many business owners provide paid vacation and personal days. And, some employers may even offer unlimited PTO policies. Have you considered creating an unlimited PTO policy for your employees?

    Is Your Employee Asking for a Raise? Here’s What to Do

    At some point, your employee may ask for a higher salary or hourly wage. Although raise conversations can be uncomfortable for both you and the inquiring employee, you need to know how to handle them. What do you do when an employee is asking for a raise?

    Types of Wages That Might Come up in Your Small Business

    Deciding how to pay your employees takes careful consideration. Not only do you need to think about what payment methods for employees you will use (e.g., direct deposit vs. paper checks), but you also need to consider the types of wages you will provide.

    Some types of pay you offer employees can depend on your industry, business, and preference, like commissions. There are also mandatory wages, such as overtime.

    Read on to learn about the types of salaries and wages you may need to pay employees.

    Are You Familiar With Donning and Doffing?

    Depending on the type of business and work environment, employers might require employees to wear uniforms or protective gear. To follow federal and state laws, employers must know the regulations of employees putting on and taking off work-related gear and clothing, otherwise known as donning and doffing.

    Learn more about what is donning and doffing, common types of businesses that require it, and whether you are obligated to pay employees while they are donning and doffing.

    Calculating Overtime When Your Employee Works a Fluctuating Workweek

    You’re likely familiar with the Fair Labor and Standards Act’s (FLSA’s) rules on overtime pay. But when you have employees who work varying schedules, you might be able to calculate overtime using the fluctuating workweek method.

    Read on to learn more about a fluctuating workweek, restrictions, calculations, and how to implement it in your business.

    ADA Guidelines Your Small Business Needs to Follow

    Twenty percent of American adults have a disability. According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), 70% of individuals with severe disabilities are unemployed. To prevent discrimination in the workplace against people with disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 established ADA guidelines that businesses must follow.

    Small business owners must comply with all anti-discrimination laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, when hiring employees. To provide equal opportunities for job seekers and avoid penalties, learn about ADA compliance.

    What to Include in an Employee Handbook

    Every business should follow a set of rules and procedures to keep operations running smoothly. As your small business grows, you will need a strong employee handbook to set expectations for employees. Knowing what to include in an employee handbook can help you better enforce your business’s rules and policies.

    How to Handle the Death of an Employee in Your Small Business

    An employee’s death can be sudden and unexpected. But, you can’t be caught unaware by your employer responsibilities for handling the death of an employee.

    Although a difficult topic, you need to know what to do when an employee dies. From notifying your staff to paying out deceased employee wages, you can’t neglect your duties. Not to mention, how you handle an employee’s death speaks volumes about you and your business.

    The Pros and Cons of Hiring Seasonal Employees for Your Small Business

    Some small businesses only operate during parts of the year, such as snow plow and lawn care services. These types of businesses are usually considered seasonal employers. The idea of hiring seasonal employees may sound appealing. But, you should weigh your pros and cons before you decide to become a seasonal employer.

    What to Know About Form 941 Reconciliation

    As a small business owner, you have likely heard of IRS Form 941. If you file IRS Form 941, do you know the steps you must follow for Form 941 reconciliation? Find out how to reconcile Form 941 and why reconciliation is important for your small business.

    Creating an Unlimited PTO Policy

    Offering paid time off (PTO) is a benefit many small business owners extend to employees. Although the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not typically require PTO, many business owners provide paid vacation and personal days. And, some employers may even offer unlimited PTO policies. Have you considered creating an unlimited PTO policy for your employees?

    Is Your Employee Asking for a Raise? Here’s What to Do

    At some point, your employee may ask for a higher salary or hourly wage. Although raise conversations can be uncomfortable for both you and the inquiring employee, you need to know how to handle them. What do you do when an employee is asking for a raise?

    Types of Wages That Might Come up in Your Small Business

    Deciding how to pay your employees takes careful consideration. Not only do you need to think about what payment methods for employees you will use (e.g., direct deposit vs. paper checks), but you also need to consider the types of wages you will provide.

    Some types of pay you offer employees can depend on your industry, business, and preference, like commissions. There are also mandatory wages, such as overtime.

    Read on to learn about the types of salaries and wages you may need to pay employees.

    Are You Familiar With Donning and Doffing?

    Depending on the type of business and work environment, employers might require employees to wear uniforms or protective gear. To follow federal and state laws, employers must know the regulations of employees putting on and taking off work-related gear and clothing, otherwise known as donning and doffing.

    Learn more about what is donning and doffing, common types of businesses that require it, and whether you are obligated to pay employees while they are donning and doffing.

    Calculating Overtime When Your Employee Works a Fluctuating Workweek

    You’re likely familiar with the Fair Labor and Standards Act’s (FLSA’s) rules on overtime pay. But when you have employees who work varying schedules, you might be able to calculate overtime using the fluctuating workweek method.

    Read on to learn more about a fluctuating workweek, restrictions, calculations, and how to implement it in your business.

    ADA Guidelines Your Small Business Needs to Follow

    Twenty percent of American adults have a disability. According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), 70% of individuals with severe disabilities are unemployed. To prevent discrimination in the workplace against people with disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 established ADA guidelines that businesses must follow.

    Small business owners must comply with all anti-discrimination laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, when hiring employees. To provide equal opportunities for job seekers and avoid penalties, learn about ADA compliance.

    What to Include in an Employee Handbook

    Every business should follow a set of rules and procedures to keep operations running smoothly. As your small business grows, you will need a strong employee handbook to set expectations for employees. Knowing what to include in an employee handbook can help you better enforce your business’s rules and policies.