Payroll Blog

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  • Are You Thinking About Changing Payroll Frequency?

    posted by Rachel Blakely-Gray
    Newest Article
  • final paycheck laws

    Final Paycheck Laws by State

    posted by Rachel Blakely-Gray
    Recent Article
  • Are You Thinking About Changing Payroll Frequency?

    If you have employees, you need to determine how often you will pay them. Choosing a payroll frequency impacts how many times you run payroll and distribute wages. Common pay periods include weekly, biweekly, semimonthly, and monthly.

    After picking a pay frequency, you may want to change it. Read on to learn about changing payroll frequency, including why you would want to and how to do it.

    Final Paycheck Laws by State

    When an employee leaves your business, you must follow an employee termination checklist. One of your employer responsibilities is giving terminated employees their final pay. You must understand final paycheck laws before you attempt to distribute a parting employee’s wages.

    When paychecks are due largely depends on what state your employees are in. Read on to learn about and comply with final paycheck laws.

    Information Returns Your Small Business May Need to File

    Every small business makes payments to operate. Some of these payments must be reported to the IRS or Social Security Administration (SSA). Companies must use information returns to report qualifying payments. Do you need to file an information return?

    Learn what information returns are, which common forms small businesses might need to file, and how to file returns correctly.

    Can Your Employees Change W-4 Forms?

    New employees must complete Form W-4 before they start working at your business. With Form W-4, employees can claim withholding allowances for federal income tax withholding, which allows you to run payroll. To adjust their allowances, employees must change W-4 forms.

    As an employer, you might be wondering about the rules for updating Form W-4. Read on to learn when and how employees can change their forms, as well as your employer responsibilities when they do.

    What Is Open Enrollment?

    If you offer employer-sponsored insurance to your employees, you should be familiar with some of the health coverage terminology used in the workplace. Open enrollment is one important term related to insurance benefits. What is open enrollment?

    For Payroll Adjustments, There’s Retro Pay

    Sometimes, payroll mistakes happen. If you pay an employee less money than you should have during a pay period, you owe them retro pay. What is retro pay?

    What Are the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution Tax and Supplement Tax?

    As a small business owner, you need to stay on top of your state-specific employer responsibilities. Because each state has different laws, you may have more tax responsibilities than an employer in another state.

    If you are an employer in Massachusetts, you might be required to pay the employer medical assistance contribution (EMAC) tax. You may also be required to pay the temporary EMAC supplement tax.

    The EMAC tax and EMAC supplement tax are separate. Learn what both taxes are, whether you need to pay them, and your filing responsibilities below.

    Gross vs. Net Pay: What’s the Difference?

    Running payroll can be confusing. Although it’s natural to have payroll questions when starting out, you can’t afford to get tripped up when it comes to gross vs. net pay. Knowing the difference between gross and net pay impacts employee wages, payroll withholdings, recordkeeping, and even employer laws.

    Learn gross pay vs. net pay, how to find both types of wages, and where to record gross and net pay.

    What Is the FLSA?

    When you become an employer, you can’t always play by your own rules. There are certain federal, as well as state and local, standards you must follow. The FLSA is one set of federal regulations you need to know about and comply with. What is the FLSA?

    Safeguard Your Business’s Sensitive Information With an Employee Confidentiality Agreement

    You’ve worked hard to build your business. Although you might not want to share your business secrets, you probably need to when you hire employees. To prevent employees from revealing sensitive information that could jeopardize your business, you might have them sign an employee confidentiality agreement.

    Businesses use employee confidentiality agreements to protect their innovative ideas, effective processes, unique products, or customer information. With a confidentiality agreement, you can train employees on the ins and outs of your business and still protect your company’s most private information.

    Are You Thinking About Changing Payroll Frequency?

    If you have employees, you need to determine how often you will pay them. Choosing a payroll frequency impacts how many times you run payroll and distribute wages. Common pay periods include weekly, biweekly, semimonthly, and monthly.

    After picking a pay frequency, you may want to change it. Read on to learn about changing payroll frequency, including why you would want to and how to do it.

    Final Paycheck Laws by State

    When an employee leaves your business, you must follow an employee termination checklist. One of your employer responsibilities is giving terminated employees their final pay. You must understand final paycheck laws before you attempt to distribute a parting employee’s wages.

    When paychecks are due largely depends on what state your employees are in. Read on to learn about and comply with final paycheck laws.

    Information Returns Your Small Business May Need to File

    Every small business makes payments to operate. Some of these payments must be reported to the IRS or Social Security Administration (SSA). Companies must use information returns to report qualifying payments. Do you need to file an information return?

    Learn what information returns are, which common forms small businesses might need to file, and how to file returns correctly.

    Can Your Employees Change W-4 Forms?

    New employees must complete Form W-4 before they start working at your business. With Form W-4, employees can claim withholding allowances for federal income tax withholding, which allows you to run payroll. To adjust their allowances, employees must change W-4 forms.

    As an employer, you might be wondering about the rules for updating Form W-4. Read on to learn when and how employees can change their forms, as well as your employer responsibilities when they do.

    What Is Open Enrollment?

    If you offer employer-sponsored insurance to your employees, you should be familiar with some of the health coverage terminology used in the workplace. Open enrollment is one important term related to insurance benefits. What is open enrollment?

    For Payroll Adjustments, There’s Retro Pay

    Sometimes, payroll mistakes happen. If you pay an employee less money than you should have during a pay period, you owe them retro pay. What is retro pay?

    What Are the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution Tax and Supplement Tax?

    As a small business owner, you need to stay on top of your state-specific employer responsibilities. Because each state has different laws, you may have more tax responsibilities than an employer in another state.

    If you are an employer in Massachusetts, you might be required to pay the employer medical assistance contribution (EMAC) tax. You may also be required to pay the temporary EMAC supplement tax.

    The EMAC tax and EMAC supplement tax are separate. Learn what both taxes are, whether you need to pay them, and your filing responsibilities below.

    Gross vs. Net Pay: What’s the Difference?

    Running payroll can be confusing. Although it’s natural to have payroll questions when starting out, you can’t afford to get tripped up when it comes to gross vs. net pay. Knowing the difference between gross and net pay impacts employee wages, payroll withholdings, recordkeeping, and even employer laws.

    Learn gross pay vs. net pay, how to find both types of wages, and where to record gross and net pay.

    What Is the FLSA?

    When you become an employer, you can’t always play by your own rules. There are certain federal, as well as state and local, standards you must follow. The FLSA is one set of federal regulations you need to know about and comply with. What is the FLSA?

    Safeguard Your Business’s Sensitive Information With an Employee Confidentiality Agreement

    You’ve worked hard to build your business. Although you might not want to share your business secrets, you probably need to when you hire employees. To prevent employees from revealing sensitive information that could jeopardize your business, you might have them sign an employee confidentiality agreement.

    Businesses use employee confidentiality agreements to protect their innovative ideas, effective processes, unique products, or customer information. With a confidentiality agreement, you can train employees on the ins and outs of your business and still protect your company’s most private information.

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