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State-mandated Paid Sick Leave

Paid Sick Leave Laws by State: The Chart, Map, & Accrual Info You Need

Typically, employers get to choose whether they want to offer types of paid time off, like sick leave, to employees. But depending on your business location, you might not have a choice. Little by little, paid sick leave laws by state are on the rise.

If your employees work in a state with mandatory sick leave, you must comply. But to remain compliant, you have to know about the state sick leave law in the first place.

So, what states have paid sick leave? Can cities set paid sick leave laws? Read on for the information you need to keep things legal in your small business.

What do paid sick leave laws do?

When your employees have the flu, the last thing they want to do is get out of bed and work. Not to mention, you probably don’t want them to infect everyone at your business.

Paid sick leave laws help circumvent these types of issues.

Sick leave is time off an employee can take if they or a family member are sick. With paid sick leave, the employee receives the same wages as if they worked.

Currently, there is no federal sick leave law. However, 11 states and Washington D.C. provide state sick pay.

State sick leave laws ensure that all businesses covered by the law provide paid leave to sick employees.

Generally, paid sick leave laws by state specify information like accrued time off rates, maximum accrual limits, and which employers must follow the law. Employers can choose to go beyond the state’s requirements (e.g., letting employees accrue more time than the accrual limit).

Paid sick leave laws by state

So, are you responsible for paying your employees when they’re out sick? If your business is located in a state with paid sick leave laws, the answer is yes.

The following have state leave laws (click on the state to learn more):

Maine recently passed a law allowing employees to take paid leave for any reason, including sick leave. This law goes into effect in January 2021.
Paid sick leave laws by state map

Again, state paid sick leave laws can differ. One of the main differences between state laws is how quickly employees can accrue paid sick leave.

However, all states allow employers to “front-load” sick time. Front-loading means that employers give employees their paid sick leave hours in one lump sum at the beginning of the year.

Ready to learn more about sick leave laws by state? Each of the following sections details important information about the law, including:

  1. Which employers must follow the law
  2. What employees can use paid sick leave for
  3. The accrual rate and cap
  4. How long employees must wait to use earned time
  5. What happens to accrued and unused paid sick leave
  6. Where to go for more information

Arizona

Arizona’s paid sick leave law is under the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act, which was established in 2017.

Eligible employers

All Arizona employers are subject to paid sick leave laws, including small business owners. However, employer size affects the maximum accrual limit.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use earned paid sick leave when seeking medical care or dealing with a mental or physical illness, injury, or other health condition.

Arizona employees can use their paid sick leave to care for family members, too. Under Arizona law, a family member is the employee’s:

  • Child (Biological, adopted, foster, step, child of a domestic partner, or any child the employee has stood in loco parentis for)
  • Parent (Biological, adopted, foster, step, parent of a spouse or domestic partner, or any parent who stood in loco parentis for the employee, their spouse, or domestic partner)
  • Spouse or domestic partner
  • Grandparent or grandchild
  • Sibling
  • Family member equivalent

Accrual rate and cap

In Arizona, employees accrue one hour of earned paid sick leave per 30 hours worked. Arizona’s paid sick leave limit depends on business size.

Employers with 15 or more employees: The maximum time an employee can accrue is 40 hours of earned paid sick leave per year.

Employers with fewer than 15 employees: The maximum time an employee can accrue is 24 hours of earned paid sick leave per year.

Waiting period

Employees start accruing earned paid sick time when they start working at an Arizona business. Employers can let employees use sick time as it accrues, or they can establish a waiting period of 90 days.

Carryover rules

If you’re an Arizona employer, you must let your employees carry over unused sick leave to the next year. Or, you can pay out unused sick leave.

For more information

Check out Arizona’s state website for more information on mandatory paid sick leave law.

California

California’s Paid Sick Leave law went into effect in 2015. Read on for the answers you need to California’s accrual rate and limits, waiting period, and more.

Eligible employers

All employers, regardless of size, must provide paid sick leave to employees who work for them at least 30 days.

However, there are exemptions. Air carrier companies and employers who have a collective bargaining agreement with employees do not have to provide state-mandated paid sick leave.

Paid sick leave use

California employees can use paid sick leave if they or a family member need:

  • Preventive care or diagnosis (e.g., flu shots)
  • Care or treatment for a health condition
  • Time after being the victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking

Under California’s Paid Sick Leave law, family members include parents, children, spouses, registered domestic partners, grandparents, grandchildren, and siblings.

Accrual rate and cap

Employees earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours of work. Employers can set a maximum accrual limit at 24 hours per year.

Waiting period

Again, employees must work at least 30 days for the same employer to be eligible for paid sick leave. Employees can begin taking sick leave after working for an employer for 90 days.

Carryover rules

California law requires employers to allow employees to carry over their accrued sick time from year to year.

If an employee does carry over time, employers can limit their total accrued paid sick leave to 48 hours.

For more information

You can learn more about the paid sick leave law by visiting California’s state website.

Connecticut

Connecticut’s mandatory sick leave law was the first in the nation, beginning in 2012.

Eligible employers

All employers with 50 or more employees must provide their employees with paid sick leave.

Employees must work an average of 10 or more hours per week to be eligible to take paid sick leave.

Paid sick leave use

So, what can employees use paid sick leave for in Connecticut? Employees can use the time for theirs or their spouse or child’s:

  • Illness, injury, or health condition
  • Medical diagnosis or preventative medical care
  • Care or treatment of physical or mental illness

Connecticut employees can also use paid sick leave if they were the victim of domestic violence or sexual assault.

Accrual rate and cap

Employees accrue one per of paid sick leave per 40 hours worked. The Connecticut maximum accrual limit is 40 hours per year.

Waiting period

Employees can only use paid sick leave after they’ve completed 680 hours of work at a company.

If an employee works 8-hour days, this means they can take paid sick leave after working 85 workdays.

Carryover rules

What happens to unused and earned time off at the end of the year? Employees can carry over a maximum of 40 hours from year to year.

For more information

Head on over to Connecticut’s website for more information on paid sick leave laws.

Maine (coming soon)

Although you don’t need to pay employees for time off this year or next year, you will need to start in 2021. Maine’s new law, “An Act Authorizing Earned Employee Leave,” requires employers to let employees take paid time off for any reason, not just sick leave.

Maine’s new law is the first law in the nation that mandates paid time off for sick leave, vacation days, etc.

Eligible employers

Employers with 10 or more employees who work more than 120 hours annually must provide paid time off (not including seasonal workers).

Paid sick leave use

Information on paid sick leave use is forthcoming.

Accrual rate and cap

Maine employees earn one hour of paid leave for every 40 hours worked. The maximum accrual is 40 hours of paid leave per year.

Waiting period

Employees begin accruing leave as soon as they start working for a Maine employer. They can use their earned time off after 120 days of employment.

Carryover rules

Information on whether Maine employees can carry over paid time off is forthcoming.

For more information

You can view more information about this groundbreaking law here.

Maryland

Maryland’s paid sick and safe leave law is known as the Maryland Healthy Working Families Act. The law was established in 2018.

Eligible employers

Under the Maryland Healthy Working Families Act, employers with 15 or more employees must offer paid sick leave.

To be eligible for paid sick leave, employees must work at least 12 hours per week.

If you’re a Maryland employer with fewer than 15 employees, you might have to provide unpaid leave for certain employees. Contact the state of Maryland for more information on your unpaid sick leave responsibilities.

Paid sick leave use

So, what can Maryland employees use paid sick leave for?

According to the state’s law, employees can use paid sick leave for themselves or their spouse, child, parent, grandparent, grandchild, or sibling. Employees can use leave for themselves or family to:

  • Care or treat physical or mental illness, injury, or condition
  • Obtain preventative care
  • Seek services following domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking

Additionally, employees can use paid sick leave for themselves when they take parental leave.

Accrual rate and cap

Employees working in Maryland are entitled to one hour of paid sick leave per 30 hours worked.

Employers can set a maximum accrual limit of 40 hours per year. And, employers may limit an employee’s total accrued time to 64 hours.

Waiting period

Before using paid sick leave, employees must work for the business for at least 106 days.

Carryover rules

Maryland law allows employees to carry over 40 hours of paid sick leave from one year to the next. Again, keep in mind that total accrued time cannot be more than 64 hours.

For more information

Check out Maryland’s state website for more information on paid sick leave.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts’ Earned Sick Time Law began in 2015. If you’re a Massachusetts employer, what are your paid sick leave responsibilities?

Eligible employers

The state law requires all Massachusetts employers with 11 or more employees to provide paid sick leave. And, employers with fewer than 11 employees must provide unpaid earned sick time.

Some employees are exempt from receiving sick leave, including U.S. government workers and students in a college work-study program.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use paid or unpaid sick leave for themselves or a child, spouse, parent, or parent of a spouse. Paid and unpaid sick leave covers:

  • Care for a physical or mental illness, injury, or medical condition
  • Professional medical diagnosis or care
  • Preventative medical care or routine appointments
  • Services after domestic violence (e.g., counseling or legal action)
  • Travel to and from a qualifying appointment

Accrual rate and cap

Employees accrue paid sick leave at a rate of one hour per 30 hours worked. The maximum number of hours an employee can accrue per year is 40 hours.

Waiting period

As soon as an employee starts working for an employer, they begin accruing sick leave. However, they must wait until the 90th calendar day after they start working at a business.

Carryover rules

Typically, employees can carry over 40 hours of unused and earned paid sick leave from one year to the next. However, employers do not have to let employees carry over time if they provide paid sick leave in a lump sum at the beginning of the year.

For more information

Hungry for more information on Massachusetts’ Earned Sick Time Law? Check out the state’s website to learn more.

Michigan

In March 2019, Michigan’s Paid Medical Leave Act took effect.

Eligible employers

Not all Michigan employers must provide paid medical leave. And, not all employees are covered by the sick leave law.

Employers with 50 or more employees must provide paid medical leave. However, government positions are exempt.

Examples of exempt employees include those who worked less than 25 hours per week in the previous year and those exempt from overtime pay.

Paid sick leave use

An employee can use paid medical leave for themselves or a family member if they:

  • Need care for a physical or mental illness, injury, or health condition
  • Seek medical diagnosis, care, or treatment
  • Obtain preventative care
  • Were exposed to a communicable disease

The term family member includes the following:

  • Child (Biological, adopted, foster, step, child of a domestic partner, or any child the employee has stood in loco parentis for)
  • Parent (Biological, adopted, foster, step, parent of a spouse or domestic partner, or any parent who stood in loco parentis for the employee, their spouse, or domestic partner)
  • Spouse or domestic partner
  • Grandparent or grandchild
  • Sibling

Employees can use paid medical leave if a public official closes their workplace or child’s school due to a public emergency. And, employees can use paid medical leave following domestic violence or sexual assault.

Accrual rate and cap

Employees accrue one hour of paid sick leave per 35 hours worked. Employers can cap accrual at one hour per calendar week or 40 hours per year.

Waiting period

Although accrual starts immediately, employees cannot take paid medical leave until the 90th calendar day after starting their job.

Carryover rules

Employees can carry over 40 hours from one year to the next. However, employers who give employees a lump sum at the beginning of the year don’t have to let employees carry over unused time.

For more information

Go to Michigan’s state page to learn more about their paid medical leave law.

New Jersey

New Jersey’s earned sick leave law started in October 2018.

Eligible employers

All New Jersey employers, regardless of size, must follow the state’s paid sick leave law.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use paid sick leave for themselves or a family member for:

  • The diagnosis, care, treatment, or recovery from mental or physical illness
  • Injury or other adverse health condition
  • Preventative medical care
  • Seeking services following domestic or sexual violence
  • Workplace or child’s school closure due to public emergency
  • Time needed to attend a child’s school-related conference, function, etc.

Under New Jersey law, “family member” refers to an employee’s child, grandchild, sibling, spouse, domestic or civil union partner, parent, or grandparent. A spouse’s parent, grandparent, sibling, or other family member is also covered.

Accrual rate and cap

Employees accrue one hour per 30 hours worked under New Jersey’s paid sick leave law. And, employers can cap annual accruals at 40 hours.

Waiting period

Employees start accruing paid sick leave when they start working at a business. But, employees can’t use paid sick leave until they’ve been at a business for 120 calendar days.

Carryover rules

Employees can carry over 40 unused paid sick leave hours from one year to the next.

For more information

You can view New Jersey’s state website for more information on earned sick leave.

Oregon

Oregon’s paid sick leave law went into effect January 2016. If you’re an Oregon employer, read on to find out how it affects you.

Eligible employers

Employers who employ at least 10 employees in Oregon must provide paid sick leave. If employers have operations in Portland, they must provide paid sick leave if they have at least six employees.

Small businesses that aren’t required to provide paid sick leave are required to provide unpaid sick leave.

Like most state sick leave laws, federal government employees working in Oregon are exempt from the paid sick leave law.

Paid sick leave use

What can Oregon employees use paid sick leave for?

Under Oregon’s paid sick leave law, employees can use sick leave for themselves or a family member to seek:

  • Care for a mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition
  • Medical diagnosis, care, or treatment
  • Preventative care

Oregon classifies the following as family members:

  • Spouse
  • Domestic partner
  • Child
  • Parent
  • Grandparent or grandchild
  • Anyone the employee has or had a loco parentis relationship with

Further, Oregon lets employees use paid sick leave to:

  • Care for an infant or newly adopted child
  • Deal with absences associated with the death of a family member
  • Seek services following domestic violence, harassment, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Deal with a public health emergency in the workplace or at their child’s school
  • Accrual rate and cap
  • Oregon employees accrue one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. Or, employees accrue 1 and ⅓ hours per 40 days worked.

The maximum hours an employee can accrue per year is 40.

Waiting period

Although employees start accruing paid sick leave immediately, they must wait until the 91st calendar day to start using accrued time.

Carryover rules

Oregon employees can carry over 40 hours of unused paid sick leave from year to year. However, employers can cap an employee’s total accrued balance at 80 hours.

For more information

Check out Oregon’s state website for more information on paid sick leave.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island established the Health and Safe Families and Workplaces Act in July 2018.

Eligible employers

Employers with 18 or more employees must offer paid sick leave. If you’re a Rhode Island employer with fewer than 18 employees, provide unpaid sick leave.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use paid sick leave for themselves or a family member to:

  • Stay home when they are too sick to work
  • Seek care when injured
  • Attend a routine medical appointment
  • Deal with the impact of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Accrual rate and cap
  • The accrual rate for paid sick leave in Rhode Island is one hour per 35 hours worked. Employees can earn up to 32 hours in 2019. For years after 2019, employees can earn up to 40 hours.

Waiting period

Although employees accrue paid sick leave immediately, they must go through a 90-day waiting period to take leave.

Carryover rules

Employers must let employees carry over their unused paid sick leave. Or, employers can pay employees for their accrued time.

For more information

Go to Rhode Island’s state website for more information on paid sick leave laws.

Vermont

Vermont’s paid sick leave law went into effect in 2017.

Eligible employers

All Vermont employers must offer paid sick leave to their employees.

There are some exceptions to which employees are eligible for paid sick leave. For example, government employees and employees working an average of less than 18 hours per week cannot receive paid sick leave.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use paid sick leave for themselves or a family member. Family members include children, parents, grandparents, spouses, or parents-in-law.

Workers can use paid sick leave for themselves or a family member to:

  • Obtain health care
  • Travel to an appointment related to long-term care
  • Address effects of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Deal with workplace or school closures due to public health
  • Accrual rate and cap
  • Employees earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 52 hours worked in Vermont. Employers can set an accrual cap of 40 hours in 2019.

Waiting period

Employees begin accruing paid sick leave on their first day of employment. Employers can either let employees use paid sick leave as it accrues or set a waiting period of up to one year.

Carryover rules

Employees who accrue paid sick leave can carry up to 40 hours from one year to the next.

Employers who give employees a lump sum of paid sick leave do not need to let employees carry it over.

For more information

Looking for more information? Go to Vermont’s state website for more on paid sick leave.

Washington

Washington’s paid sick leave law took effect January 2018. Are you a Washington state employer? If so, buckle up for the information below.

Eligible employers

All Washington employers must give their employees paid sick leave.

However, some employees are exempt from paid sick leave. Employees exempt from Washington’s Minimum Wage Act are also exempt from receiving paid sick leave.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use paid sick leave to care for their or their family’s health needs, deal with workplace or school closures, or take time off relating to domestic violence.

Accrual rate and cap

Washington employees accrue one hour of paid sick leave per 40 hours worked. Employers cannot set an accrual cap.

Waiting period

Employees can’t use accrued paid sick leave until the 90th calendar day after starting work at a business.

Carryover rules

Washington employees can carry over up to 40 years of paid sick leave from one year to the next.

For more information

Check out Washington’s state website for more information on paid sick leave.

Washington D.C.

Washington D.C.’s paid sick leave law is known as the Accrued Sick and Safe Leave Act of 2008.

Eligible employers

All employers, regardless of size, must provide paid sick leave to employees. However, employer size impacts the accrual rate and cap.

Paid sick leave use

Employees can use paid sick leave for themselves and family members for:

  • Illness or medical appointments
  • Absences associated with domestic violence or sexual abuse

Accrual rate and cap

Under Washington D.C.’s paid sick leave law, the accrual rate and annual cap depend on business size.

Employers with fewer than 25 employees: Employees accrue one hour per 87 hours worked. The maximum annual accrual is 24 hours.

Employers with 25 – 99 employees: Employees accrue one hour per 43 hours worked. The maximum annual accrual is 40 hours.

Employers with 100 or more employees: Employees accrue one hour per 37 hours worked. The maximum annual accrual is 56 hours.

Waiting period

Washington D.C. employees begin accruing paid sick leave when they start working at a business. Employees can use earned paid sick leave after 90 days of work.

Carryover rules

Employees can carry over their earned but unused paid sick leave from one year to the next.

For more information

For more information on Washington D.C.’s paid sick leave, check out their state website.

Paid sick leave laws chart: State

Want critical information—like paid sick leave accrual rates—at the tip of your fingers? Take a look at our chart below for important paid sick leave laws by state.

State Eligible Employers Accrual Rate Annual Accrual Cap
Arizona All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 24 hours (employers with fewer than 15 employees

40 hours (employers with 15 or more employees)
California All employers* 1 hour / 30 worked 24 hours
Connecticut Employers with 50 or more employees 1 hour / 40 worked 40 hours
Maine (coming soon—paid leave for any reason) Employers with 10 or more employees 1 hour / 40 worked 40 hours
Maryland Employers with 15 or more employees 1 hour/ 30 worked 40 hours
Massachusetts Employers with 11 or more employees 1 hour/ 30 worked 40 hours
Michigan Employers with 50 or more employees 1 hour / 35 worked 40 hours
New Jersey All employers 1 hour/ 30 worked 40 hours
Oregon Employers with 10 or more employees 1 hour / 30 worked

OR

1 ⅓ hours / 40 worked
40 hours
Rhode Island Employers with 18 or more employees 1 hour / 35 worked 32 hours
Vermont All employers 1 hour / 52 worked 40 hours
Washington All employers 1 hour / 40 worked No cap
Washington D.C. All employers 1 hour per 87 hours worked (employers with fewer than 25 employees)

1 hour / 43 hours worked (employers with 25 – 99 employees)

1 hour / 37 worked (employers with 100 or more employees)
24 hours (employers with fewer than 25 employees)

40 hours (employers with 25 – 99 employees)

56 hours (employers with 100 or more employees)

Mandatory sick leave by city and county

There are also cities and counties with mandatory sick leave laws. The following cities require eligible employers to give employees paid sick leave:

  • Berkeley, California
  • Emeryville, California
  • Los Angeles, California
  • Oakland, California
  • San Diego, California
  • San Francisco, California
  • Santa Monica, California
  • Chicago, Illinois
  • Cook County, Illinois
  • Montgomery County, Maryland
  • Duluth, Minnesota
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • St. Paul, Minnesota
  • New York City, New York
  • Westchester County, New York
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Austin, Texas
  • Dallas, Texas (coming soon)
  • San Antonio, Texas (coming soon)
  • Seattle, Washington
  • Tacoma, Washington

As you can see, some of the cities above are located in states with paid sick leave laws. City and state laws may have different rules, like maximum accrual limits, and which employers the law applies to.

If your business is in a city with both city and state paid leave laws, you must follow whichever is most generous to the employee.

For example, California’s mandatory sick leave law says that employees can accrue up to 40 hours of time off. However, San Francisco’s law says that employees can accrue up to 72 hours if they work for an employer with 10 or more employees.

Paid sick leave laws chart: City and county

Take a look at the chart below to get an overview of paid sick leave laws by city and county. Click on the city name to view more information on the city’s website.

Find out which employers must comply with paid sick leave laws, how many hours employees accrue per hours worked, and how many hours employees can earn per year.

City/County Eligible Employers Accrual Rate Annual Accrual Cap
Berkeley, California All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours (employers with fewer than 25 employees)

72 hours (employers with 25 employees or more)
Emeryville, California All employers* 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours (employers with fewer than 56 employees)

72 hours (employers with 56 or more employees)
Los Angeles, California All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 72 hours
Oakland, California All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 40 hours (employers with fewer than 10 employees)

72 hours (employers with 10 or more employees)
San Diego, California All employers 1 hour/ 30 worked 80 hours
San Francisco, California All employers 1 hour/ 30 worked 40 hours (employers with fewer than 10 employees)

72 hours (employers with 10 or more employees)
Santa Monica, California All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 40 hours (employers with fewer than 26 employees)

72 hours (employers with 26 or more employees)
Chicago, Illinois All employers 1 hour / 40 worked 40 hours
Cook County, Illinois All employers 1 hour / 40 worked 40 hours
Montgomery County, Maryland All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 56 hours
Duluth, Minnesota (coming soon 2020) Employers with 5 or more employees 1 hour / 50 worked 64 hours
St. Paul, Minnesota All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours
Minneapolis, Minnesota Employers with 6 or more employees 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours
New York City, New York Employers with 5 or more employees 1 hour / 30 worked 40 hours
Westchester County, New York Employers with 5 or more employees 1 hour / 30 worked 40 hours
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Employers with 10 or more employees 1 hour / 40 worked 40 hours
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania All employers 1 hour / 35 worked 24 hours (employers with fewer than 15 employees)

40 hours (employers with 15 or more employees)
Austin, Texas Employers with 6 or more employees 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours (employers with fewer than 16 employees)

64 hours (employers with 16 or more employees)
Dallas, Texas (effective August 2019) All employers 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours (employers with fewer than 15 employees)

64 hours (employers with more than 15 employees)
San Antonio, Texas (effective TBD) Employers with more than 5 employees 1 hour / 30 worked 48 hours (employers with 6-15 employees)

64 hours (employers with more than 15 employees)
Seattle, Washington All employers 1 hour / 40 worked (1-249 full-time equivalents)

1 hour / 30 worked (employers with 250 or more full-time equivalents)
No cap
Tacoma, Washington All employers 1 hour / 40 worked No cap

Paid leave laws don’t apply to you? Not so fast…

If you don’t have to offer employees paid sick leave, you may not be completely off the hook. Depending on your business size, you might need to provide unpaid leave.

Under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, employers with more than 50 employees must provide employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year. Eligible employees can take parental leave or time to care for themselves or a family member with a serious health condition.

If state or city paid sick leave laws don’t apply to you, you can still offer the benefits to your employees. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 71% of employees have access to paid sick leave benefits. This majority statistic shows that many employers voluntarily offer paid sick leave.

And even if the FMLA rules don’t apply to you and you don’t want to provide paid sick leave, you still need to be vigilant. Keep an eye out for new state, city, and county laws.

While we strive to keep the information in this article current, new laws may go into effect. If you think we missed a state, city, or county with paid sick leave, please email us at marketing@patriotsoftware.com.

Need help recording how many sick leave days your employees accrue and use? Patriot’s online time and attendance software is a great add-on to our online payroll software. Start your self-guided demo today!

Payroll rules are tricky and difficult to track. Connect with us on Facebook to get the updates you need! (Plus, we love making new friends).

This article has been updated from its original publication date of February 1, 2017.

This is not intended as legal advice; for more information, please click here.

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